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Daily Deity #239 Ebisu
With summer officially starting tomorrow it seemed that a good subject for today's Daily Deity would involve a god that dealt with one of the many traditions of this season. For myself, fishing is one of those traditions which lead me to choose the Shinto god, Ebisu. 
Before we get into what Ebisu does, we need to discuss his parentage. There are two contested origins of Ebisu. One states that he is the son of Daikoku, a god of wealth. Another states that he has some connection to Koto-shiro-nushi, and if he is this god, that would make him the son of Okuninushi, but this is also a debated claim. It is most likely, and more commonly stated, that Ebisu is the son of top gods Izanami and Izanagi. When he is related to these two Ebisu is thought to have first been Hiruko, who is first child of the cosmic pair, but born deformed. The name Hiruko translates to "leech child" which indicates fairly well what was felt about this child. Izanami and Izanagi eventually set Hiruko off to sea
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Literature
Daily Deity #238 Tinia
If I were to give an overview of what Etruscan mythology is, I would say that Etruscan mythology is the transition between Greek mythology and Roman mythology. The subject of this Daily Deity is a prime example of that. 
Tinia, also called Tin or Tinh or Tinis, was the Etruscan top god. He is also considered to be the god of the skies and is responsible for making storms. In essence, he is the Etruscan form of the Classical king of the gods, Zeus. For the most part the Greek Zeus, Roman Jupiter, and Etruscan Tinia are the same god. However, there are additional aspects of Tinia that are prevalent enough to consider him apart from Zeus and apart from Jupiter as well.
While Tinia was the ruler of his pantheon, he was not the only ruling god. There were a total of nine gods that worked together to lead the rest of the pantheon. Each of these nine gods possessed a lightening bolt, which is a massive step away from the Greek and Roman pantheons. In those, only Zeus was allowed to use t
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Literature
Daily Deity #237 Ahiuzotl
With the summer right around the corner it seemed appropriate to tell about a monster that could be just below the surface of the next lake you visit. The possibility of this monster being around is increased if you happen to be near a water source that's within the territory of the ancient Aztec empire. 
The Ahuizotl is one of the many water based monsters of the world. When it comes to mythology the moment that there are monsters in water it just makes them all the more unique. This Aztec monster is by no means an exception to this trend. 
For the most part, the Ahuizotl is a dog. Most sources state that this creature is like a dog crossed with a monkey or a man. So while the base is that of a dog, this monster also has hands where the paws would be on the average dog. As well, the Ahuizotl has a long tail which ends with another hand. It is said to be covered in fur, but it also said to be sleek and slippery at the same time. The color of this creature is most often said t
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Literature
Daily Deity #236 Belobog
If you are fellow fan of Neil Gaiman's American Gods (the novel in this case) then you are likely familiar with the name of this god. If not, then you are likely more familiar with his brother Chernobog (Disney's Fantasia "Night on Bald Mountain" segment anyone?). These two brothers are just about as opposite as can be. That mainly has to do with their personalities. 
Belobog is considered to be the good brother. He's a Slavic god and has quite a few versions of his name. Belobog is also called Belabog, Bielobog, Bielebog, Belun, and a few other variations. No matter the name he is said to be a benevolent and kind god. His multiple roles only enforce this as he is most often said to be the god of light usually regarding the sun, but also of luck and happiness as well. When depicted he is often seen in all white, with a big white beard, and holding a staff. 
His brother on the other hand... not so much. Chernobog is said to be wicked and evil. Belo
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Literature
Daily Deity #235 Tumatauenga
For today's Daily Deity we head to the gods that call the islands of the Pacific their home. These would be the Polynesian and Maori gods.
Tumatauenga ranks pretty high in these pantheons and that is mostly due to his parents. The name Tumatauenga is the Polynesian spelling of his name. In the scope of the Maori gods he is called Tu, and in Hawaii he is known as Ku. He is the son of Rangi, the god of sky, and Papa, the goddess of the Earth; which is the most common way that those two roles are distributed. However, Tumatauenga is not the only child of this cosmic couple. His other brothers are Rongo, Tane, Tangaroa, Haumia-tiketike, and Tawhirmatea. Tumatauenga's five brothers, respectively, are the gods of the agriculture, the forests, the seas, another plant/agricultural god, and a storm god. Tumatauenga himself is the odd one out, as he is a war god. 
The story of these brothers really begins with their parents. Rangi and Papa were close. Literally close. The two
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Literature
Daily Deity #234 Aja
Despite this Orisha not being one of the most prominent in her pantheon she certainly has a lot to offer the Earth.
For those that don't know, an Orisha is the term used for the gods of the Yoruba pantheon, like how the Greek gods are called Olympians and some of the Norse gods are Aesir. The Yoruba gods originate from West Africa, most notably Nigeria and Benin, but are well known to have spread throughout the world due to the slave trade. As happened with any people who moved in whatever way around the world, they took their culture and customs with them. Today, many Orishas can be found in the Caribbean with only small alterations, if any, to their original characters from Nigeria. 
In the case of Aja it doesn't seem that she managed to make it to the Caribbean. As unfortunate as this is, it does make sense. She wasn't one of the central or highest ranking gods in her pantheon, and she wouldn't be someone to pray to get assistance. However, that doesn't mean that she isn't impo
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Literature
Daily Deity #233 Geb
While it may seem rare with well known abundance of female deities that deal in nature based roles there are plenty of gods who also take their place in environmental spheres. What is rare, however, is to find a god of the Earth, as opposed to the far more common goddess of the Earth. The most popular and widely known God of the Earth is Geb.
This Egyptian god is likely a deity that many are likely familiar with and that's why we'll start with the most popular story of him. Geb is the son of the god of air, Shu, and Tefnut, the goddess of moisture. Shu and Tefnut, both created by Amun (the original form of sun god, Ra), were also the parents of Nut, the sky goddess (whom we covered several Daily Deities back.) Eventually Nut and Geb end up in a relationship. This is mythology things like that tend to happen. In truth, their relationship wouldn't have been an issue if Amun wasn't so concerned with losing his role as head of the pantheon. Amun know that he could control those already aro
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Literature
Daily Deity #232 Gyhldeptis
To find this forest loving goddess you'll have to head up North to find her. Specifically, the northwestern part of British Columbia and the southeastern area of Alaska. It is here that she has been worshiped by the Haidu and Tlingit people for centuries. 
To the people who worshiped her, Gyhldeptis was known as "Lady Hanging Hair." She was so called this because of the large swathes of moss that are on the massive, hanging branches of the cedar trees which grow to monumental sizes in the rain forests of the North. The branches were equated with her own long hair and chances are that Gyhldeptis really enjoys this comparison. Not only is she very protective of the forests that she tends to, but she also dearly loves her worshipers and likely only felt their affection for her in the nickname. Her affection for humans is what leads to the most prominent story about her.  
Let's first set the scene. The places in Alaska and British Columbia that the Haidu and Tlingit peoples orig
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Literature
Daily Deity #231 Jord
For the first day of Earth Week we're heading up north to the Nine Realms of Norse mythology to discuss their local earth goddess. 
The Norse goddess of the Earth is Jörd (her name even directly translates into "earth"), sometimes called Fjörgyn or Hlodyn. Despite her not having really any role in the Norse myths, she is a vitally important goddess. Jörd happens to be the mother of Thor, easily one of cornerstone gods of Norse mythology. Due to Jörd being Thor's mother means that Odin, at one point, happened upon her and decided that they were a decent enough pairing, even if only for a little while. The odd thing about Jörd is that she just disappears after this. She's said to be the mother of Thor and an earth goddess and then the rest for the rest of Norse mythology she's gone. Even though we don't have a lot on this goddess, we do have a little bit more information to disclose about her. 
Jörd, when attributed wi
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Literature
Daily Deity #230 Renpet
This rather unknown Egyptian goddess had a bigger role than some may realize, but what else is new with a religion that had its heyday over a thousand years ago. 
Renpet is considered to be the Egyptian goddess of spring. Like most goddesses connected with spring, Renpet also dealt with fertility and with youth. We've had plenty of discussions as to how spring and fertility work together, and the reason that many and most spring goddesses (and Earth goddesses) are connected to fertility is because people see life emerge in spring (and from the Earth.) This relationship just goes hand in hand. So, if you have a goddess of spring or a goddess of fertility, then it's likely that they're also going to have role in the other. When it's said that she's the goddess of youth it's not meant as youth as in children, but in younger age. Actually, age is a very important factor to this goddess. 
Aside from the roles that we've already discussed, Renpet was well known as the "Mistres
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Literature
Daily Deity #229 Crow
As many know April first is a day for pranks and tricks and some laughs at the expense of others. If there were any gods in the world that would appreciate a day like today it would be the infamous trickster gods. For today's April Fool's Day we are discussing Crow from Australian Aboriginal mythology. 
Before we go any further, if you read the name Crow and immediately started thinking about gods and spirits from North America you're not wrong. There are several Crows in the mythologies throughout North America and the majority of them are tricksters as well. While they are similar they are far from the same god. One day we'll get to those Crows, but today we're focused in Australia. 
The Australian Crow goes by mainly three names: Waang, Waa, Wahn. He is mainly a god of the people of the Kulin nation, located in modern day Victoria and largely situated around Melbourne. To the people who worshiped Crow he was much more of a hero than a trickster, much like the Polynesian tr
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Literature
Daily Deity #228 Mama Ocllo
It has been quite some time since we looked into any of the immortals of the Incan pantheon. To rectify that situation the subject of today's Daily Deity is the Incan goddess Mama Ocllo. And just a quick refresher, the Incan gods are the deities that were worshiped largely along the Andean mountain range in South America which included the modern-day nations of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, and the north west corner of Argentina. 
Mama Ocllo is one of the many Incan goddesses that possess the title of "Mama." It means what you would think, meaning "mother of" whatever it is the goddess is associated with. One of the most famous examples is Mama Pacha, whom we covered some time ago. She is the Incan nature goddess, and her name literally translates to Mother Earth. We'll get to why Mama Ocllo attained her title in a moment, but first just a word of advice. If you're ever out looking for this goddess, it's helpful to know that she goes by quite a few names. Some of the more popular
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Literature
Daily Deity #227 Eriu
Today is Saint Patrick's Day and since Saint Patrick's Day originated in Ireland I figured that it would be appropriate to discuss the goddess that Ireland is named after. 
That goddess is Ériu, also called Érie or Eyre. She is a very old Celtic deity and can probably be best described as an Earth goddess. The most likely reason that Ériu is considered an Earth goddess is because of her being a patron of Ireland, much like her two sisters. 
Ériu's two sisters are actually one of the most important aspects of her, much like the rest of her family. Ériu's sisters are the goddesses Banba and Fodla. Together, they form one of three sets of triplets by the Celtic goddess Ernmas. Ernmas herself is a member of the Tuatha De Danann, the race of gods in Celtic mythology. This would make her children also Tuatha De, but Eriu isn't always considered to be one of the Tuatha De and that's due to her main consort, Elatha. 
Elatha is no
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Literature
Daily Deity #226 Morpheus
As many know, March 15th is the Ides of March, which has become infamous for the saying "Beware the Ides" which are alluding to the murder of Julius Caesar in 44 BC. That saying "Beware the Ides" actually comes from Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar" where a soothsayer comes along and tells Caesar the quote. Historically, that's not what actually happened, but Caesar was forewarned about the assassination by his third wife, Calpurnia. Shakespeare took this incident and relayed it in his play as Calpurnia having a dream about her husband's death. And that's what inspired today's Daily Deity.  
Morpheus is the Greco-Roman god of dreams. His is the son of Hypnos, an old god of sleep and brother of Thanatos. Morpheus's mother is kind of up for debate. Likely it's Pasithea, the Charity of relaxation and Hypnos's wife, but she isn't always connected to Morpheus in anyway let alone being his mother. Granted, it does make sense for her to be his mother, considering her role as a goddess.&
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Literature
Daily Deity #225 Daramulum
If you want to become acquainted with this god it would be best if you headed over to New South Wales, Australia which is his historic stomping grounds. 
Daramulum is an Aboriginal god of weather, shamans, and the moon. All three of these aspects make he a very important god to us humans. Weather gods are important no matter where any one lives, because weather largely determines how one lives their life. In New South Wales the climate is subtropical, which means that all four seasons are experienced. Actively changing weather only creates a more vital role to a weather god. 
In his dealings with shamans Daramulum largely acts as a middle-man and advocate between mankind and the gods. The main job of a shaman is already to contact spirits and or gods, and we already know how some gods act. So, it's very beneficial to have a god on our side, speaking on our behalf. In the case of Daramulum he mostly helps to get our messages across to his father, chief god Baiame. And don't wo
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Literature
Daily Deity #224 Belet-Seri
If you've ever thought that there was no way that a deity could judge you once you die because they couldn't possibly know everything about you, I have some news for you: there's a god for that. 
Belet-Seri first came around as an Akkadian goddess of the Underworld, but later was mixed in with the large swath of gods of the whole of Mesopotamia as time progressed. For this reason she is said to also be Geshtinanna, a Babylonian goddess. However, these two goddesses don't seem to actually be the same goddess that just received a name change. Chances are that these two got linked when people were trying to consolidate pantheons as more lands united together. So, for now, we'll regard these two as different goddesses. 
Belet-Seri is the wife (at least one of them) of Amurru, god of nomads. He also was said to be the god of the Akkadian mountains. Due to her relationship with him, Belet-Seri gained the title Queen of the Desert. 
However, Belet-Seri has a much greater role t
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With summer officially starting tomorrow it seemed that a good subject for today's Daily Deity would involve a god that dealt with one of the many traditions of this season. For myself, fishing is one of those traditions which lead me to choose the Shinto god, Ebisu. 

Before we get into what Ebisu does, we need to discuss his parentage. There are two contested origins of Ebisu. One states that he is the son of Daikoku, a god of wealth. Another states that he has some connection to Koto-shiro-nushi, and if he is this god, that would make him the son of Okuninushi, but this is also a debated claim. It is most likely, and more commonly stated, that Ebisu is the son of top gods Izanami and Izanagi. When he is related to these two Ebisu is thought to have first been Hiruko, who is first child of the cosmic pair, but born deformed. The name Hiruko translates to "leech child" which indicates fairly well what was felt about this child. Izanami and Izanagi eventually set Hiruko off to sea on a boat made of reeds. If Hiruko is in fact the same god as Ebisu, that means that Hiruko learned how to fish on his reed boat and eventually made it back to Japan. 

Whatever the case is, Ebisu is a god that seemingly has no ill-will towards anybody. Ebisu is actually one of the Shichi-fuku-jin, who are the seven Japanese gods of luck. His fellow luck gods are Benten, Bishamon, Fukurokuju, Iurogin, Daikoku, and Hotei. Each of these gods have their own subset of influence over a certain activity or job or concept. As well, these gods aren't related by blood. They aren't all siblings or father and child or such. In fact, they weren't even linked together as luck gods until several centuries of their existence. 

As stated before Ebisu is the god of fishing, as well as a luck god and also a god that is said to represent people like fishermen and the average working man. He is usually connected with Daikoku here as both luck gods are said to preside over shops and other small businesses and the people who work in them. 

Yet, the true center of Ebisu lies in his love of fishing and this is especially shown in his appearance. The best way to describe his physique is by saying that he is Santa Claus-esque, in both his round belly and jolly smile. In one hand Ebisu holds a fishing pole and in the other a fish, commonly depicted to be a red snapper. This image of Ebisu can be found throughout Japan, because even though he is a god most associated with fishing, he is a god that seems to be willing to help anyone who needs a little luck. 
If I were to give an overview of what Etruscan mythology is, I would say that Etruscan mythology is the transition between Greek mythology and Roman mythology. The subject of this Daily Deity is a prime example of that. 

Tinia, also called Tin or Tinh or Tinis, was the Etruscan top god. He is also considered to be the god of the skies and is responsible for making storms. In essence, he is the Etruscan form of the Classical king of the gods, Zeus. For the most part the Greek Zeus, Roman Jupiter, and Etruscan Tinia are the same god. However, there are additional aspects of Tinia that are prevalent enough to consider him apart from Zeus and apart from Jupiter as well.

While Tinia was the ruler of his pantheon, he was not the only ruling god. There were a total of nine gods that worked together to lead the rest of the pantheon. Each of these nine gods possessed a lightening bolt, which is a massive step away from the Greek and Roman pantheons. In those, only Zeus was allowed to use the thunderbolts that were crafted for him. But don't think that this makes Tinia equal with the other gods he worked with. Tinia himself had three lightening bolts which placed him in the uppermost location in his pantheon.

Even still, Tinia didn't have such a tyrannical rule as Zeus seemingly did. Tinia worked within a trinity of the nine Etruscan top gods which were made up by his wife Uni, the Etruscan form of Juno/Hera, and Menrva, the Etruscan of Minerva/Athena. This little triumvirate is a comforting aspect when thinking about mythology. For the most part, mythology is well known to have crazy gods that end up causing a lot of problems for mortals. With three gods batting around any big time decisions, it would seem that they wouldn't create issues for the people that worshiped them. 

Though Tinia is similar to Zeus in many ways, including symbolism with eagles and laurel wreaths (which the Etruscan god Apulu was also represented by) there are some very key differences between the Etruscan god and the Greek immortal. Perhaps of the most glaring differences between the two is that Tinia also seems to be a loyal husband and decent father. One of the most famous children of Zeus is the heroic strongman, Heracles/Hercules. There is also a version of this hero in Etruscan mythology, but he is called Hercle. The mother of Hercle is not completely made clear, but it is most likely Uni. 

In regards to the three pantheons that we've discussed today, the Etruscan gods almost act as the bridge between the Greek gods and the Roman gods. While it's clear that the Greek gods influenced the Etruscan gods, it's likely that the ancient peoples of Tuscany developed a different way of viewing and interpreting the original Greek gods. Their influences are also likely what lead to the Roman gods seeming to be more refined than their Greek counterparts. 
With the summer right around the corner it seemed appropriate to tell about a monster that could be just below the surface of the next lake you visit. The possibility of this monster being around is increased if you happen to be near a water source that's within the territory of the ancient Aztec empire. 

The Ahuizotl is one of the many water based monsters of the world. When it comes to mythology the moment that there are monsters in water it just makes them all the more unique. This Aztec monster is by no means an exception to this trend. 

For the most part, the Ahuizotl is a dog. Most sources state that this creature is like a dog crossed with a monkey or a man. So while the base is that of a dog, this monster also has hands where the paws would be on the average dog. As well, the Ahuizotl has a long tail which ends with another hand. It is said to be covered in fur, but it also said to be sleek and slippery at the same time. The color of this creature is most often said to be black. 

Like most monsters of the world the Ahuizotl's favorite prey is said to be humans. But not the whole human. The Ahuizotl's favorite parts to eat of a person are the nails, the teeth, and the eyes. Why those very small and not especially nutrient-rich parts of the body, I'm not really sure, but if you ever come across an Ahuizotl it's something to ask. The way that the Ahuizotl is said to have preyed upon people is by luring the person to the water's edge or into the water. The main way they did this is by making a cry that sounds like that of a human infant. Hopefully, any person who happens to be walking near a body of water and heard a baby's cry would go investigate to make sure that the infant is fine. That is what the Ahuizotl was counting on. And when the person came close enough to the water, the Ahuizotl would strike out and grab the human and drag them into the water where they would drown and the Ahuizotl could feed. 

Like most of mythology there are some very obvious creatures or structures or events in the world that qualify its existence in myth. In the case of the Ahuizotl, this monster sounds like the very real giant otter which lives in and along the Amazon River. An otter fits both the description of a combined dog and monkey fairly well. When wet, the entire body of the otter is sleek and, in the case of the giant otter, looks dark brown or black. Otters are animals well known for using their paws to grasp objects and their paws bear a striking resemblance to hands. The giant otter regularly meets a length of six feet, making them some of the largest animals in their habitat.If you listen to their calls, they can make a sound that sounds similar to a child crying, especially if it is a young otter calling for its mother. The only issue with the giant otter be Ahuizotl is that they exist only in the Amazon and are not located in Mexico. This doesn't mean that the Aztecs never saw these animals though, and a traveler returning to the empire probably had a good story to tell when he saw an animal like the giant otter. 
If you are fellow fan of Neil Gaiman's American Gods (the novel in this case) then you are likely familiar with the name of this god. If not, then you are likely more familiar with his brother Chernobog (Disney's Fantasia "Night on Bald Mountain" segment anyone?). These two brothers are just about as opposite as can be. That mainly has to do with their personalities. 

Belobog is considered to be the good brother. He's a Slavic god and has quite a few versions of his name. Belobog is also called Belabog, Bielobog, Bielebog, Belun, and a few other variations. No matter the name he is said to be a benevolent and kind god. His multiple roles only enforce this as he is most often said to be the god of light usually regarding the sun, but also of luck and happiness as well. When depicted he is often seen in all white, with a big white beard, and holding a staff. 

His brother on the other hand... not so much. Chernobog is said to be wicked and evil. Belobog eventually can't stand the terrible ways of his brother any longer, or perhaps Chernobog couldn't stand the goody-two shoes way of his brother. Either way, the two eventually become enemies. 

This all seems like a pretty common story in history. There's a good sibling and a bad sibling and they are forced to fight one another. Usually to explain a balance in the universe. And that's all fine, it's in plenty of stories and cultures around the world. However, there's a very large chance that Slavic mythology didn't exactly have that. A lot of people doubt Belobog's existence. 

By that I don't mean that people think he's real in an atheistic type of way, I mean that many mythographers and historians don't think even the ancient Slavic people worshiped him. And yes, this sounds really strange. You're probably asking yourself, "Well, if there was never any record of him, how was Belobog ever thought to be a god?" The answer is a medieval German priest named Helmold. Way back in the 1100s he wrote a book called the Chronica Slavorum which essentially translates to "Chronicles of the Slavs." This book told all about the culture of the people that fall under the umbrella term of Slavic, meaning the majority of Eastern Europeans. As well all know, people didn't really care about political correctness back then. In Helmold's book he wrote about Slavic deities. The accuracy of his writings is what many mythographers take issue with. This is because before him, there are no records of Belobog. Some go the other way and say that Helmold didn't write about Belobog and therefore he never existed. 

However, there are two gods that may be the real Belobog or may be who Belobog was confused with. These three gods are most importantly Dazsbog, a sun god, and Stribog, a luck god. As well, there are a pair of gods from Zoroastrianism that have nearly identical roles and a relationship to Belobog and Chernobog, who are Ahura Mazda (the good one) and Ahriman (the bad one.) 

Maybe one day we'll have the answer as to whether Belobog was ever truly worshiped and therefore a real god. Until then, it's up to each person who reads this to decide if they think Belobog ever was out there in the world or the creation of medieval scholars who didn't really understand the cultures they were reporting on. Regardless, it's kind of nice to think that there's one more god out there that is trying to balance the bad with the good. 
For today's Daily Deity we head to the gods that call the islands of the Pacific their home. These would be the Polynesian and Maori gods.

Tumatauenga ranks pretty high in these pantheons and that is mostly due to his parents. The name Tumatauenga is the Polynesian spelling of his name. In the scope of the Maori gods he is called Tu, and in Hawaii he is known as Ku. He is the son of Rangi, the god of sky, and Papa, the goddess of the Earth; which is the most common way that those two roles are distributed. However, Tumatauenga is not the only child of this cosmic couple. His other brothers are Rongo, Tane, Tangaroa, Haumia-tiketike, and Tawhirmatea. Tumatauenga's five brothers, respectively, are the gods of the agriculture, the forests, the seas, another plant/agricultural god, and a storm god. Tumatauenga himself is the odd one out, as he is a war god. 

The story of these brothers really begins with their parents. Rangi and Papa were close. Literally close. The two basically bear-hugged each other each day, every day which left their children crushed between them. Even though these gods were the only beings around at the time, it's fair to assume that most people wouldn't be too pleased with sharing a room with five siblings. To say that the children were unhappy with their situation is a massive understatement. So, they did what most rational people would do. They talked. 

Considering this is mythology, that's a fairly big change in direction from most other cases. 

The boys went around and around each other, trying to come up with a plan to let them having some breathing space. Tumatauenga, being the future war god he was, suggested that they kill their parents. The other five non-parricidal sons immediately denied that plan of action. The talks began again and it was Tane who eventually came up with the winning proposal. Tane's plan was to simply separate the pair. This separation would then leave Rangi up in the sky and Papa down below. 

The execution of this plan is as simple as the plan itself. The brothers are to push their parents away from one another. Rongo, Tumatauenga, Haumia-tiketike, and Tangaroa all try and fail to get their parents apart. It is then Tane that lies on his back, sets his feet against his father, and pushes with all his might and finally frees them. If you're thinking that this story sounds really familiar then you're probably thinking of Egyptian mythology's Geb and Nut, who were separated from one another in order to prevent their father Ra's eventually take over. The case of Rangi and Papa are a little different, but close enough to bring attention to. 

After the separation of their parents the brothers go off and mark out their own corners of the world. For the most part, this means that the gods have children. The spouses and lives of each of the brothers will be discussed in their own Daily Deities. The important thing to know about them is who or what their children were. 

Tane, likely the most famous of the siblings, had a large number of children who were birds, as well as some plants and bugs. How that happens I don't really know, but it's mythology and weirder things have happened. The other brothers followed suit with this trend of having non-human or godly children. Rongo is technically considered the father of any agriculturally grown crops, as he is the one who created them, which includes foods like yams and gourds. Tangaroa is the ancestor of fish and reptiles. Haumia-tiketike developed many wild plants that were also staples of the diets of the native people. 

Shortly after the majority of the brothers settle into their respective roles Tawhirmatea's rage explodes. Since the time that Tane first developed the plan to separate Rangi and Papa, Tawhirmatea has been brooding. He never agreed to the plan and thought that it was wrong of the brothers to act in the way they did. 

Tawhirmatea, being the storm god he is, creates massive winds and terrible storms and chases down his brothers. Tane's forests are demolished and he goes into hiding. Tangaroa is chased down by Tawhirmatea's storms and flees into the sea. Rongo and Haumia-tiketike are also pursued and hide within a cave that their mother created for them. The only one that Tawhirmatea cannot chase away is Tumatauenga. 

Tumatauenga is angry with Tawhirmatea for causing such great destruction to their homes. He is also angry at his other four brothers for acting so cowardly and running away to hide instead of fighting against their other brother. However, he's willing to deal with them later. He has to deal with the storm god and neither Tumatauenga or Tawhirmatea are willing to back down. 

They fight long and harsh battles against one another. Time and time again the brothers clash and each time they seem to be equally matched and are unable to over power the other. Eventually, Tawhirmatea leaves since he knows that neither he or Tumatauenga will ever be able to best the other, and even if that time does come there will be too much time in between that is wasted.  

Finally free of his struggle against his brother, Tumatauenga decides to turn his attention to his other four brothers that decided to hide themselves away instead of fight. The greatest retribution that Tumatauenga can commit against his brothers is to hurt their children. Tumatauenga begins to hunt down and/or capture the children of his brothers and prepared them as items for consumption. This meant that vegetables, fish, birds, and such were now available for humans to eat. Tumatauenga is sometimes regarded to be the first human. At the very least, he is likely the origin of human life on the planet in Polynesian culture. 

So, we have Tumatauenga to thank for both the foods that we can eat and the wars that we wage. But that's what tends to happen when the war god ends up being the hero. 

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mythgirl68
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So, next week is Earth week and I would like to continue on in last year's tradition of having a full week of just Earth and nature based mythological beings as the subjects of the Daily Deity. And, as always, I would very much like for suggestions to be made. The suggestion can be either the name of the subject themselves or a pantheon or just a question if there are any gods of apples, for example. (As a matter of fact, there are quite a few.) 

As a reminder these were last year's Earth week Daily Deities:

Daily Deity #166 Pan Gu and the World's BeginningIn honor of the first day of Earth week, we're going to start with one of the many stories that tell of how the Earth and all it's inhabitants were created. For today, we drift into Taoism or Chinese mythology for an explanation.
In the beginning there was an egg.
Which I think just might answer the age-old question of whether it was the chicken or the egg that came first.
Now whether this egg was chaos, or the egg housed chaos, or the egg was surrounded by chaos depends on the story who you're hearing the story from. Really any of the options are viable because the truth of the matter is that it doesn't matter as much where chaos but the fact that chaos was there.
Ah, yes chaos. One of the most primordial entities that ever existed and a commonality that pretty much every single mythology talked about.
Back to the story at hand, because some super important stuff is going on inside that egg. Remember, this is Taoism, and one of the corner stone beliefs of Taoism are the concepts of Yi
    

Daily Deity #167 Mama PachaI've always really loved the name of this Earth goddess, because Mama is really the essence of this goddess.
Mama Pacha is the Incan Earth goddess responsible for the fertility of the land and the growing of crops, effectively making her Mother Earth. Well... at least one of them.
It's not like these are uncommon when it comes to Earth gods, but the importance of these jobs should not be overlooked. Really, these gods are some of the most important in a pantheon, because they are the ones that allow us humans to live. If these gods don't like you, then there is no way that you're going to be growing your food and that means that you're not going to be around much longer either.
While most Earth gods are usually pretty kind and easy-going, Mama Pacha adds something very... ah, violent to the role.
See, Mama Pacha had the ability to take the form of a dragon, and was more than willing to take on that form at any given moment.
Unlike the majority of Earth gods, Mama Pacha is also responsi


Daily Deity #168 MedeinaWhen in the category of nature gods one is going to inevitably find themselves very familiar with gods and goddesses of the hunt as well. Medeina is one of these goddesses.
You'll have to head to the forests of the Baltic nations to find this goddess since that's her home turf. Unfortunately Medeina is a bit hard to track down and so information is a bit limited on her, but that doesn't mean that we're going to ignore her.
Like I said, nature god and gods of the hunt often tend to be linked together, and Medeina is a very good example why that happens. Her main role is not really as a hunting goddess in the way that a goddess like Artemis is, instead Medeina is more of a goddess that does her very best to not allow a hunt to happen.
She does this mainly by employing her symbolic animal, the hare. Whenever a hunter or hunters enter her forest, Medeina will sent out her hares to go run about the forest. The hunters then rush about the woods, following after a creature that is lightening


Daily Deity #169 CernunnosThis Celtic forest god is pretty much the prime example of the Horned God and often functions as one half of the power couple for Wiccans.
Cernunnos has a lot of history to him, but none of it really has anything to do with mythology. Like a vast amount of gods in the world, Cernunnos isn't said to be related to anyone else in his pantheon. Perhaps it's better that Cernunnos doesn't have to worry about family, as he has a lot of roles in the Celtic pantheon.
Before we get into what he does, it's best to get a description of what this god looks like. As I said above, Cernunnos is a Horned God, and that does mean that he has antlers growing out of his head. Massive ones. Ones that would make a perfect ten point buck jealous. Sometimes these deer qualities extend beyond the antlers, and he is sometimes said to have the lower half of deer as well, complete with hooves and fuzzy legs. Commonly, this nature god is also said to possess a fairly magnificent beard and that reminds me of the wis


Daily Deity #170 GaiaThe quintessential image of Mother Earth is usually placed upon Gaia, the Earth goddess of Classical mythology.
Though she is probably better described as Grandmother Earth since that was her role to most of the gods of Olympus. Not to dismiss the Titans or anything, but let's be honest, no one ever really worshiped the Titans. Also, Gaia hated the vast majority of the Titans by the end of their reign so I don't think she'd mind us thinking of her as Granny Gaia.
Gaia is actually the oldest immortal in the Greco-Roman pantheon as she is the first being that emerged from Chaos, which was kind of just floating around making up the entire universe at the time. Fairly soon afterwards, and I'm sure that time was pretty meaningless then, she gave birth to Pontus and Uranus, who represented the sea and sky respectively. The three of them kind of worked together (I'm sure you can figure out what that means) to form the second generation of immortals, the Titans.
Well, sorta.
Gaia married Uranu


So, please leave any suggestions or requests! And, as always, thanks for reading! 

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FacelessBuster Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017
Happy Birthday mythgirl68! Your work is amazing and you are amazing and by the gods! Hope you have a nice birthday
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mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you so much! 
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kyrtuck Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy Birthday to youse!
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mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Aw, thanks! 
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Jdailey1991 Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017
Happy Birthday
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:iconmythgirl68:
mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you! 
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Obelis Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy birthday! :happybounce:
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mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! Giggle 
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Atlantis536 Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Have you heard of Siats from Ute mythology, Seitaad from Navajo mythology, Kelenken from the southern Argentinian mythology, and Jobar from the Taureg mythology? I've heard them mentioned, but all I find about them is about the prehistoric animals that bear their names.
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mythgirl68 Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
I've heard of some of those but most of the times that I hear them it's in relation to prehistoric animals. (I'm also a big fan of prehistory and paleontology.) These names are now on my list for further research and when (or if) I have a good amount of information on them you will see a Daily Deity about them. 
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