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Daily Deity #234 Aja
Despite this Orisha not being one of the most prominent in her pantheon she certainly has a lot to offer the Earth.
For those that don't know, an Orisha is the term used for the gods of the Yoruba pantheon, like how the Greek gods are called Olympians and some of the Norse gods are Aesir. The Yoruba gods originate from West Africa, most notably Nigeria and Benin, but are well known to have spread throughout the world due to the slave trade. As happened with any people who moved in whatever way around the world, they took their culture and customs with them. Today, many Orishas can be found in the Caribbean with only small alterations, if any, to their original characters from Nigeria. 
In the case of Aja it doesn't seem that she managed to make it to the Caribbean. As unfortunate as this is, it does make sense. She wasn't one of the central or highest ranking gods in her pantheon, and she wouldn't be someone to pray to get assistance. However, that doesn't mean that she isn't impo
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Literature
Daily Deity #233 Geb
While it may seem rare with well known abundance of female deities that deal in nature based roles there are plenty of gods who also take their place in environmental spheres. What is rare, however, is to find a god of the Earth, as opposed to the far more common goddess of the Earth. The most popular and widely known God of the Earth is Geb.
This Egyptian god is likely a deity that many are likely familiar with and that's why we'll start with the most popular story of him. Geb is the son of the god of air, Shu, and Tefnut, the goddess of moisture. Shu and Tefnut, both created by Amun (the original form of sun god, Ra), were also the parents of Nut, the sky goddess (whom we covered several Daily Deities back.) Eventually Nut and Geb end up in a relationship. This is mythology things like that tend to happen. In truth, their relationship wouldn't have been an issue if Amun wasn't so concerned with losing his role as head of the pantheon. Amun know that he could control those already aro
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Literature
Daily Deity #232 Gyhldeptis
To find this forest loving goddess you'll have to head up North to find her. Specifically, the northwestern part of British Columbia and the southeastern area of Alaska. It is here that she has been worshiped by the Haidu and Tlingit people for centuries. 
To the people who worshiped her, Gyhldeptis was known as "Lady Hanging Hair." She was so called this because of the large swathes of moss that are on the massive, hanging branches of the cedar trees which grow to monumental sizes in the rain forests of the North. The branches were equated with her own long hair and chances are that Gyhldeptis really enjoys this comparison. Not only is she very protective of the forests that she tends to, but she also dearly loves her worshipers and likely only felt their affection for her in the nickname. Her affection for humans is what leads to the most prominent story about her.  
Let's first set the scene. The places in Alaska and British Columbia that the Haidu and Tlingit peoples orig
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Literature
Daily Deity #231 Jord
For the first day of Earth Week we're heading up north to the Nine Realms of Norse mythology to discuss their local earth goddess. 
The Norse goddess of the Earth is Jörd (her name even directly translates into "earth"), sometimes called Fjörgyn or Hlodyn. Despite her not having really any role in the Norse myths, she is a vitally important goddess. Jörd happens to be the mother of Thor, easily one of cornerstone gods of Norse mythology. Due to Jörd being Thor's mother means that Odin, at one point, happened upon her and decided that they were a decent enough pairing, even if only for a little while. The odd thing about Jörd is that she just disappears after this. She's said to be the mother of Thor and an earth goddess and then the rest for the rest of Norse mythology she's gone. Even though we don't have a lot on this goddess, we do have a little bit more information to disclose about her. 
Jörd, when attributed wi
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Literature
Daily Deity #230 Renpet
This rather unknown Egyptian goddess had a bigger role than some may realize, but what else is new with a religion that had its heyday over a thousand years ago. 
Renpet is considered to be the Egyptian goddess of spring. Like most goddesses connected with spring, Renpet also dealt with fertility and with youth. We've had plenty of discussions as to how spring and fertility work together, and the reason that many and most spring goddesses (and Earth goddesses) are connected to fertility is because people see life emerge in spring (and from the Earth.) This relationship just goes hand in hand. So, if you have a goddess of spring or a goddess of fertility, then it's likely that they're also going to have role in the other. When it's said that she's the goddess of youth it's not meant as youth as in children, but in younger age. Actually, age is a very important factor to this goddess. 
Aside from the roles that we've already discussed, Renpet was well known as the "Mistres
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Literature
Daily Deity #229 Crow
As many know April first is a day for pranks and tricks and some laughs at the expense of others. If there were any gods in the world that would appreciate a day like today it would be the infamous trickster gods. For today's April Fool's Day we are discussing Crow from Australian Aboriginal mythology. 
Before we go any further, if you read the name Crow and immediately started thinking about gods and spirits from North America you're not wrong. There are several Crows in the mythologies throughout North America and the majority of them are tricksters as well. While they are similar they are far from the same god. One day we'll get to those Crows, but today we're focused in Australia. 
The Australian Crow goes by mainly three names: Waang, Waa, Wahn. He is mainly a god of the people of the Kulin nation, located in modern day Victoria and largely situated around Melbourne. To the people who worshiped Crow he was much more of a hero than a trickster, much like the Polynesian tr
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Literature
Daily Deity #228 Mama Ocllo
It has been quite some time since we looked into any of the immortals of the Incan pantheon. To rectify that situation the subject of today's Daily Deity is the Incan goddess Mama Ocllo. And just a quick refresher, the Incan gods are the deities that were worshiped largely along the Andean mountain range in South America which included the modern-day nations of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, and the north west corner of Argentina. 
Mama Ocllo is one of the many Incan goddesses that possess the title of "Mama." It means what you would think, meaning "mother of" whatever it is the goddess is associated with. One of the most famous examples is Mama Pacha, whom we covered some time ago. She is the Incan nature goddess, and her name literally translates to Mother Earth. We'll get to why Mama Ocllo attained her title in a moment, but first just a word of advice. If you're ever out looking for this goddess, it's helpful to know that she goes by quite a few names. Some of the more popular
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Literature
Daily Deity #227 Eriu
Today is Saint Patrick's Day and since Saint Patrick's Day originated in Ireland I figured that it would be appropriate to discuss the goddess that Ireland is named after. 
That goddess is Ériu, also called Érie or Eyre. She is a very old Celtic deity and can probably be best described as an Earth goddess. The most likely reason that Ériu is considered an Earth goddess is because of her being a patron of Ireland, much like her two sisters. 
Ériu's two sisters are actually one of the most important aspects of her, much like the rest of her family. Ériu's sisters are the goddesses Banba and Fodla. Together, they form one of three sets of triplets by the Celtic goddess Ernmas. Ernmas herself is a member of the Tuatha De Danann, the race of gods in Celtic mythology. This would make her children also Tuatha De, but Eriu isn't always considered to be one of the Tuatha De and that's due to her main consort, Elatha. 
Elatha is no
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Literature
Daily Deity #226 Morpheus
As many know, March 15th is the Ides of March, which has become infamous for the saying "Beware the Ides" which are alluding to the murder of Julius Caesar in 44 BC. That saying "Beware the Ides" actually comes from Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar" where a soothsayer comes along and tells Caesar the quote. Historically, that's not what actually happened, but Caesar was forewarned about the assassination by his third wife, Calpurnia. Shakespeare took this incident and relayed it in his play as Calpurnia having a dream about her husband's death. And that's what inspired today's Daily Deity.  
Morpheus is the Greco-Roman god of dreams. His is the son of Hypnos, an old god of sleep and brother of Thanatos. Morpheus's mother is kind of up for debate. Likely it's Pasithea, the Charity of relaxation and Hypnos's wife, but she isn't always connected to Morpheus in anyway let alone being his mother. Granted, it does make sense for her to be his mother, considering her role as a goddess.&
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Literature
Daily Deity #225 Daramulum
If you want to become acquainted with this god it would be best if you headed over to New South Wales, Australia which is his historic stomping grounds. 
Daramulum is an Aboriginal god of weather, shamans, and the moon. All three of these aspects make he a very important god to us humans. Weather gods are important no matter where any one lives, because weather largely determines how one lives their life. In New South Wales the climate is subtropical, which means that all four seasons are experienced. Actively changing weather only creates a more vital role to a weather god. 
In his dealings with shamans Daramulum largely acts as a middle-man and advocate between mankind and the gods. The main job of a shaman is already to contact spirits and or gods, and we already know how some gods act. So, it's very beneficial to have a god on our side, speaking on our behalf. In the case of Daramulum he mostly helps to get our messages across to his father, chief god Baiame. And don't wo
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Literature
Daily Deity #224 Belet-Seri
If you've ever thought that there was no way that a deity could judge you once you die because they couldn't possibly know everything about you, I have some news for you: there's a god for that. 
Belet-Seri first came around as an Akkadian goddess of the Underworld, but later was mixed in with the large swath of gods of the whole of Mesopotamia as time progressed. For this reason she is said to also be Geshtinanna, a Babylonian goddess. However, these two goddesses don't seem to actually be the same goddess that just received a name change. Chances are that these two got linked when people were trying to consolidate pantheons as more lands united together. So, for now, we'll regard these two as different goddesses. 
Belet-Seri is the wife (at least one of them) of Amurru, god of nomads. He also was said to be the god of the Akkadian mountains. Due to her relationship with him, Belet-Seri gained the title Queen of the Desert. 
However, Belet-Seri has a much greater role t
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Literature
Daily Deity #223 Mokosh
This Slavic goddess is one of the many great examples of a motherly goddess, for both the rest of her pantheon and humanity. 
Mokosh is a goddess of many different roles. She is probably best described as a goddess of fertility, as this aspect of her can be applied to the majority of her roles. Mokosh is both a goddess of the Earth as well as a goddess of the home. She deals largely in areas like keeping house, weaving, and childbirth which makes her a goddess that is more likely to be worshiped by women over men. Her main role as a fertility goddess is what links her most with childbirth, which is a pretty common trait among goddess of both the Earth and/or the home. Yet, originally Mokosh was an old Earth goddess. When linked with fertility this means that she helps things grow. Her name even means "moist" as in moisture relating to rain. But she is said to bring rain in a way that evokes both aspects of her as rain is said to be the milk that comes from her breasts. In fact, in
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Literature
Daily Deity #222 Deimos and Phobos
Last March we discussed how the month got its name from the Latinized name of the Greek war god, Ares. So, for the start of this March, it seemed appropriate to talk about some of his most famous children. 
These children would be the terror-inducing fear gods, Deimos and Phobos. These two gods are products of one of the many infamous trysts of Ares and Aphrodite. This makes them full siblings with Harmonia, Adrestia, and Anteros. Like the rest of their siblings, Harmonia excluded, these gods took after their father more than their mother. 
You can say what you want about Ares, and there are plenty of flaws about this god, but he liked to keep his business in the family. When a war broke out in Greece, or somewhere around Greece, Ares would head over and help the side that he liked best. Helping his side for Ares usually meant sabotaging the opposite army and he most often did this by riding around in his war chariot. Deimos and Phobos were his charioteers and would steer the
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Literature
Daily Deity #221 Aizen-Myoo
For this Valentine's Day we have a love god that might just be the farthest outlier on the scope of love gods in the world. 
The first aspect of Aizen-Myoo that we need to discuss is the several different iterations that he went through. Aizen-Myoo is the Japanese form of his name, and this is the last form of him to come into being. He original was Ragaraja, a Hindu deity. He then became adapted into Buddhism in India, which then traveled to China where he became Airan Mingwang. From there he was able to be picked by the Japanese Shinto religion, which then integrated more with Buddhism over time. When in Japan he became Aizen-Myoo, which is probably his more recognized form. Today he is mainly regarded as a Buddhism deity. 
Most gods aren't able to travel through so many different places and religions without becoming a completely different deity by the end of it. That's not what happened with Aizen-Myoo. He managed to retain who he was through each place he was brought int
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Literature
Daily Deity #220 Nut
For those of you not in the know, tonight (Feb 10, 2017) and tomorrow we are having quite a lot of activity in the night sky. There's a full moon, called the snow moon, a penumbral lunar eclipse, and the New Year comet. With all this celestial activity I figured that it would be appropriate to talk about a god that deals with sky, especially heavenly bodies. 
That made me immediately think of Nut, the Egyptian goddess of the sky and the celestial bodies. She certainly stands out among the sky deities of the world, namely because she is a goddess and not a god. Most of the immortals that have domain over the entire sky, meaning not someone who controls the moon or the sun, are male like Zeus or Thor. Nut is an exception to this rule, and I would say that she even has more weigh in her role as sky goddess than most other gods. The reason for that is simple. She herself is the sky.
She is depicted with her skin a dark blue, the color of a nighttime sky, and is dotted with stars. Thin
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Literature
Daily Deity #219 Brigid
For most Americans we know February 2nd as Groundhog Day. The day that Punxsutawney Phil comes out of his home and if he sees his shadow then there are six more weeks of winter, and if he doesn't spring comes early. What most people might not know is that the foundation behind the tradition of Groundhog Day comes from the old Celtic holiday of Imbolc, which happens to be today! The timing of Imbolc is one of the most important factors of the holiday, as it is between the winter and spring solstice. I'm sure that plenty of us are well aware of that stretch nearing March when you just can't take the gray skies and biting wind anymore and would do anything to see green leaves and be comfortable outside again. That's purpose of the holiday, to serve as a reminder that spring, warmer weather, crops, and game would be returning soon. But there was another reason to celebrate Imbolc, and that was our subject of today's Daily Deity: Brigid. 
Brigid is the Celtic goddes
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Despite this Orisha not being one of the most prominent in her pantheon she certainly has a lot to offer the Earth.

For those that don't know, an Orisha is the term used for the gods of the Yoruba pantheon, like how the Greek gods are called Olympians and some of the Norse gods are Aesir. The Yoruba gods originate from West Africa, most notably Nigeria and Benin, but are well known to have spread throughout the world due to the slave trade. As happened with any people who moved in whatever way around the world, they took their culture and customs with them. Today, many Orishas can be found in the Caribbean with only small alterations, if any, to their original characters from Nigeria. 

In the case of Aja it doesn't seem that she managed to make it to the Caribbean. As unfortunate as this is, it does make sense. She wasn't one of the central or highest ranking gods in her pantheon, and she wouldn't be someone to pray to get assistance. However, that doesn't mean that she isn't important to us humans. But before we get to that, we need to discuss her other role. 

Aja is a nature-based goddess. She is mainly considered a goddess of the forest, but she also is a goddess of animals. While it may seem common or assumed that most deities of the Earth or of the forest or other physical form of nature would be attached to animals, this is not always the case. It is far more common to find hunter gods fall under the category of nature gods. Even though most hunter gods usually also deal with the protection for the animals they hunt, there is something inherently different in a goddess who only protects animals without hunting them.

With her larger forest aspect is where Aja applies more to her interactions with humans. One of the main roles of any nature deity or spirit is to keep the health of the environment in which they live. Aja just seems to take this one step further. Along with acting as a forest and animal goddess, Aja is also a healer goddess. 

Being a healer/medicinal god is not that rare of a role to have, and it's an extremely important role in any pantheon. Yet, with Aja we have a new and more reasonable approach to healing. Most gods of healing can heal just through an incantation or a wave of their hands. Not that this makes them any less important, but it sort of distances themselves away from humans. Aja did the exact opposite. Instead of just snapping her fingers and getting rid of someone's sniffles, she went into the forests that she knew so well. 

In her forests she would find plants with medicinal properties and mix the herbs and roots and other plant parts together to form the cure that was needed. Aja wasn't too tight-lipped with her knowledge either and was well-known for sharing the information she gained with humans. However, that doesn't mean that she would just walk into a town, stand in the center, and start rattling off ingredients to prevent headaches. What she did do was wait for someone to come and find her. 

This person was usually a shaman in training, or someone of the like. There are varying lengths of time that are said in how long the person needed to be out in the forest before Aja approached them with her knowledge, but it was a significant portion of time. During this time the person proved themselves to be worthy of being passed on how to use the properties of plants to heal others.

For this reason alone Aja is unlike so many other Earth deities. In most cases, earth gods rarely have any direct interactions with humans. Usually the only interactions that occur between nature gods and humans is either to scare humans out of the woods or to kill them. But Aja isn't like that. Instead of trying to keep people out of the forests and away from nature, she extended her realm to us in order to show the importance of what was in the natural world. This is perhaps one of the most essential messages any Earth goddess has ever presented to humanity. It provides an inherent respect for the Earth and it is possibly the best way to generate a need to protect and conserve the natural world. 
While it may seem rare with well known abundance of female deities that deal in nature based roles there are plenty of gods who also take their place in environmental spheres. What is rare, however, is to find a god of the Earth, as opposed to the far more common goddess of the Earth. The most popular and widely known God of the Earth is Geb.

This Egyptian god is likely a deity that many are likely familiar with and that's why we'll start with the most popular story of him. Geb is the son of the god of air, Shu, and Tefnut, the goddess of moisture. Shu and Tefnut, both created by Amun (the original form of sun god, Ra), were also the parents of Nut, the sky goddess (whom we covered several Daily Deities back.) Eventually Nut and Geb end up in a relationship. This is mythology things like that tend to happen. In truth, their relationship wouldn't have been an issue if Amun wasn't so concerned with losing his role as head of the pantheon. Amun know that he could control those already around, but he wasn't convinced that new gods would be willing to follow along with his rule.

So Amun told Shu, who had his own issues with Geb and Nut, to separate the pair. Shu then used all his might to generate the strongest wind he could form to push Geb and Nut apart. In many tellings, Shu stood atop Geb while he pushed Nut high into the sky. Nut was stretched out over the Earth, her entire body becoming the sky. Geb, on the other hand, was laid out far below her and became the Earth himself. The two have not been in contact since. However, their union was not fruitless. Geb and Nut are the parents of five of the most important gods in Egyptian mythology: Osiris, Isis, Set, Nephthys, and Horus (at least the first one.) After this whole fiasco towards the beginning of time, things relaxed between Geb and Ra (as well as Ra and Nut.) While Geb likely mourned his separation from Nut, he did eventually seem to get over his hurt feelings and turn his attention towards his role. 

Geb is an interesting god. Many sources stop his story after he and Nut are separated, but Geb did quite a lot after this. First off, we'll discuss his appearance, as that is a critical aspect of many Egyptian deities. Geb is described and depicted as either green or a rich dark brow. With either base color, Geb was also seen with leaves covering his flesh much like the way that Nut was depicted as blue with stars dotting her skin. As well, like Nut's entire body representing the starry night sky, Geb's body is representing his role as both an Earth god and fertility. With Earth gods, fertility is relating to the ability of a land to grow crops. For thousands of years when the Nile flooded its banks and nourished the fields there would be great crops formed, and Geb was often honored for this. 

Like the majority of the Egyptian pantheon, Geb is associated with an animal. For Geb, he has a goose, of which it I would assume is an Egyptian goose. He is sometimes depicted with a goose head like Thoth or Horus, but more commonly he is seen with a goose sitting atop his head. Oddly enough, Geb's connection with geese expands from them just acting as his sacred animal. There is one story about Geb that is quite possibly the weirdest thing about him. He was said to have laid an egg. No one's completely sure how he managed that, but he's a god so I suppose he would have the ability to do whatever he wanted. This egg is often related to the "World Egg", the egg from which all things were said to originate from, or the Ogdoad, the set of eight gods that created everything before the beginning of time.

Egyptian mythology often has this trend of taking two gods from basically the opposite of the timeline of mythology and saying they are the same gods. Likely, this occurred because the gods of Egypt and the Ancient Egyptian civilization were around for so long that over time it just was easier to consolidate some gods down. This happened in a lot of places, but one of the easiest places to see the transformations is in Egyptian mythology. Just look at Ra's transition from Amun to Ra to Khepri. 

That being said, I have no doubt that Geb laid an egg. It just wasn't the World Egg, and it's probably good that it wasn't. Geb was also responsible for creating earthquakes just by laughing. With all the odd antics of the Egyptians and their original appearances he probably had a good deal to laugh about. Even though it's terrible the damage that earthquakes wrought on people, it's kind of nice to have a god that makes earth quakes through laughter instead of intense rage or horrible agony. 

As stated earlier, Geb's story usually gets cut off after the birth of his and Nut's children, but Geb has more to his story. Of all the myths in Egyptian mythology the fight between the falcon-headed god Horus and his chaos-wielding uncle Set for rule over the Egyptian pantheon is probably the most famous. There is, of course, quite a lot of details and events within this one story that we won't get into right now, but we do need to address Geb's role in the story. One of the most essential points to know is that Geb was one of the many rulers of the Egyptian gods. He took that role from Shu, who took that position from Ra. Like his predecessors, Geb eventually gave up his spot as king and he was the one who passed the crown to Osiris. During this time, after Osiris's death, Geb also becomes associated with the Underworld most likely because Osiris became King of the Underworld. 

After this we have Set taking over, disposing of Osiris twice, and causing tons of problems for Horus and Isis and several other gods who were strictly loyal to Horus, Osiris, and Isis. By this time Ra, who technically was still the top of the pantheon, was already pretty isolated and no longer concerned himself with what the rest of the pantheon was doing. This means that for the majority of the fight between Horus and Set there was no referee and this battle got bloody.

It did take some time, but eventually Geb decided that enough was enough and that he needed to intervene. Geb knew his family well and decided to give Horus Lower Egypt and Set Upper Egypt. At what point in the story this was is unknown, but it's likely some part in the middle since Horus did eventually become the king of all the gods and of all Egypt with Geb's consent. 

Overall, Geb's an interesting god. He, like many of the other Earth gods of the world, is the parent of some of the most essential immortals in a pantheon and this has greater meaning then some would realize. Geb's relationships with those gods, and with all the other aspects of himself, show the importance of the Earth, of how we all come from the Earth, both god and mortal alike. So, even though he stands out for being one of the few male Earth deities in the world, Geb also stands out just by being the god he is. 
To find this forest loving goddess you'll have to head up North to find her. Specifically, the northwestern part of British Columbia and the southeastern area of Alaska. It is here that she has been worshiped by the Haidu and Tlingit people for centuries. 

To the people who worshiped her, Gyhldeptis was known as "Lady Hanging Hair." She was so called this because of the large swathes of moss that are on the massive, hanging branches of the cedar trees which grow to monumental sizes in the rain forests of the North. The branches were equated with her own long hair and chances are that Gyhldeptis really enjoys this comparison. Not only is she very protective of the forests that she tends to, but she also dearly loves her worshipers and likely only felt their affection for her in the nickname. Her affection for humans is what leads to the most prominent story about her.  

Let's first set the scene. The places in Alaska and British Columbia that the Haidu and Tlingit peoples originate from is right along the coast which is largely compromised of islands, such as Prince of Wales Island, and include the relatively large cities like Ketchikan and Juneau. Back in the day, there were plenty of people living all over that area, like there are today. Except, back then, there was just a little problem for her people.

This problem was a whirlpool called Kaegyihl Depgeesk, which means "upside-down place." Maybe one or two people being swept away into the ocean depths by the whirlpool would have snuck by her notice, but quite a good number of poor souls were taken down by Kaegyihl Depgeesk. Gyhldeptis knew that she needed to fix this problem by any means necessary. 

Unlike most gods from around the world, Gyhldeptis's first step for fixing the problem was throwing a party. She laid out a huge spread of food and invited all the local nature spirits to come to her home and enjoy dinner with her. Well, none of them could say no to free food, especially when it came from such a kind and good-natured host like Gyhldeptis. At first, they just talked and told each other stories, keeping the mood casual. However, Gyhldeptis eventually broached the subject of Kaegyihl Depgeesk and asked for the nature spirits help in removing it. Even if they were apprehensive about facing the whirlpool, they couldn't bring it in themselves to deny Gyhldeptis on account of her asking kindly and providing them all with such a great feast. So, together, the forest goddess and the spirits broke apart the whirlpool. 

While this story is the only one of Gyhldeptis it shows several important factors about her as a goddess. The foremost is how much she cares for humans, even if it only pertains to the people who honor her. In most cases, nature gods aren't that kind to us humans. Often, they're willing to let us starve for not providing the proper offerings or because they're in a mood. For Gyhldeptis, she goes out of her way to help people. Look at how she was able to solve the issue of Kaegyihl Depgeesk. She didn't have to threat and posture, instead she provided a little incentive to the spirits who could help her and asked kindly. Unlike plenty of other nature gods, or just other gods for that matter, who are well noted by their tempers and flashing weapons, Gyhldeptis is both clever and kind enough to dispel of her issue with ease.

Those are comforting factors, as it's always nice knowing that there's a god out there that cares about us humans. Especially, a god that would go out of their way to protect humans. But I wouldn't take Gyhldeptis's kind nature for granted. It's very clear that she has a strong handle on her sphere of influence, including the other nature entities that work within her field (... or forest.) 

So, if you every end up walking around on her home turf, it's best to be kind to the trees and respectful to the land. Of course, you always should be this way and Gyhldeptis serves as a reminder of that. She probably could start up that whirlpool again anytime she wants. 
For the first day of Earth Week we're heading up north to the Nine Realms of Norse mythology to discuss their local earth goddess. 

The Norse goddess of the Earth is Jörd (her name even directly translates into "earth"), sometimes called Fjörgyn or Hlodyn. Despite her not having really any role in the Norse myths, she is a vitally important goddess. Jörd happens to be the mother of Thor, easily one of cornerstone gods of Norse mythology. Due to Jörd being Thor's mother means that Odin, at one point, happened upon her and decided that they were a decent enough pairing, even if only for a little while. The odd thing about Jörd is that she just disappears after this. She's said to be the mother of Thor and an earth goddess and then the rest for the rest of Norse mythology she's gone. Even though we don't have a lot on this goddess, we do have a little bit more information to disclose about her. 

Jörd, when attributed with parents, is said to be the daughter of Nött (the female personification of night) and Annar. Like many of the other goddesses in Norse mythology Jörd is a jotunn. A jotunn is the name for a giant, or giantess in Jörd's case, that comes from the realm of Jotunheim. While the Aesir and Jotnar tended to fight a lot, they also tended to intermarry a lot. Other examples of giants turned gods are Skadi, the icy goddess; Bestla, the wife of Bor; Aegir, the god of the seas. So, it's not by any means odd that Odin and Jörd had the chance to create the thunder god. What is very interesting about the Jotnar is the title they receive when they become gods. The giants of Norse mythology are almost always connected to nature in some way or another. Look at the examples of Skadi and Aegir. Skadi is well known as the Norse goddess of the hunt, a very common role for many of the world's nature gods. Aegir is the god of the seas, and how that applies to the natural world speaks for itself. Jörd falls right in line with this trend. 

She also falls along in the trend of Earth deities having some sort of relationship to storm/sky gods. Whether it's mother to son, or grandmother to grandson (think Gaia and Zeus), or husband and wife there are quite a lot of instances of storm gods and Earth gods having some connection. The reasoning behind this is likely because of the obvious relationship between the earth and the skies. 

Earth gods are almost always linked with fertility, meaning the fertility of the land. Aside from the minerals and nutrients that are within the ground that allow things to grow, plants and animals also need water. In simple terms, water comes from the sky, more specifically, from stormy skies. For the ancient peoples who used myths to explain the world around them, it would stand to reason that there was something causing the skies to continue to nourish the Earth with life giving water. In the case of 
Jörd and Thor, he's her son. Of course the thunderer would want to make sure his mother was doing as best as she could. 

Some may find it surprising or odd that a goddess that represented the entire earth just seemingly vanished from an entire mythology. Yet, in Norse mythology, this kind of happens with a couple of the first goddesses in Norse mythology. It truly seems that they only stuck around for a little while and then took off. Can you really blame them when one of the most important aspects of their pantheon is the end of all things? 

So maybe this Earth goddess, after giving birth to one of the most important gods in the Norse pantheon, traveled around Europe or headed to a warmer climate down south. But no matter what became of her, this goddess who embodied the whole Earth was an undeniably important part of Norse mythology despite so little known about her. 
So, next week is Earth week and I would like to continue on in last year's tradition of having a full week of just Earth and nature based mythological beings as the subjects of the Daily Deity. And, as always, I would very much like for suggestions to be made. The suggestion can be either the name of the subject themselves or a pantheon or just a question if there are any gods of apples, for example. (As a matter of fact, there are quite a few.) 

As a reminder these were last year's Earth week Daily Deities:

Daily Deity #166 Pan Gu and the World's BeginningIn honor of the first day of Earth week, we're going to start with one of the many stories that tell of how the Earth and all it's inhabitants were created. For today, we drift into Taoism or Chinese mythology for an explanation.
In the beginning there was an egg.
Which I think just might answer the age-old question of whether it was the chicken or the egg that came first.
Now whether this egg was chaos, or the egg housed chaos, or the egg was surrounded by chaos depends on the story who you're hearing the story from. Really any of the options are viable because the truth of the matter is that it doesn't matter as much where chaos but the fact that chaos was there.
Ah, yes chaos. One of the most primordial entities that ever existed and a commonality that pretty much every single mythology talked about.
Back to the story at hand, because some super important stuff is going on inside that egg. Remember, this is Taoism, and one of the corner stone beliefs of Taoism are the concepts of Yi
    

Daily Deity #167 Mama PachaI've always really loved the name of this Earth goddess, because Mama is really the essence of this goddess.
Mama Pacha is the Incan Earth goddess responsible for the fertility of the land and the growing of crops, effectively making her Mother Earth. Well... at least one of them.
It's not like these are uncommon when it comes to Earth gods, but the importance of these jobs should not be overlooked. Really, these gods are some of the most important in a pantheon, because they are the ones that allow us humans to live. If these gods don't like you, then there is no way that you're going to be growing your food and that means that you're not going to be around much longer either.
While most Earth gods are usually pretty kind and easy-going, Mama Pacha adds something very... ah, violent to the role.
See, Mama Pacha had the ability to take the form of a dragon, and was more than willing to take on that form at any given moment.
Unlike the majority of Earth gods, Mama Pacha is also responsi


Daily Deity #168 MedeinaWhen in the category of nature gods one is going to inevitably find themselves very familiar with gods and goddesses of the hunt as well. Medeina is one of these goddesses.
You'll have to head to the forests of the Baltic nations to find this goddess since that's her home turf. Unfortunately Medeina is a bit hard to track down and so information is a bit limited on her, but that doesn't mean that we're going to ignore her.
Like I said, nature god and gods of the hunt often tend to be linked together, and Medeina is a very good example why that happens. Her main role is not really as a hunting goddess in the way that a goddess like Artemis is, instead Medeina is more of a goddess that does her very best to not allow a hunt to happen.
She does this mainly by employing her symbolic animal, the hare. Whenever a hunter or hunters enter her forest, Medeina will sent out her hares to go run about the forest. The hunters then rush about the woods, following after a creature that is lightening


Daily Deity #169 CernunnosThis Celtic forest god is pretty much the prime example of the Horned God and often functions as one half of the power couple for Wiccans.
Cernunnos has a lot of history to him, but none of it really has anything to do with mythology. Like a vast amount of gods in the world, Cernunnos isn't said to be related to anyone else in his pantheon. Perhaps it's better that Cernunnos doesn't have to worry about family, as he has a lot of roles in the Celtic pantheon.
Before we get into what he does, it's best to get a description of what this god looks like. As I said above, Cernunnos is a Horned God, and that does mean that he has antlers growing out of his head. Massive ones. Ones that would make a perfect ten point buck jealous. Sometimes these deer qualities extend beyond the antlers, and he is sometimes said to have the lower half of deer as well, complete with hooves and fuzzy legs. Commonly, this nature god is also said to possess a fairly magnificent beard and that reminds me of the wis


Daily Deity #170 GaiaThe quintessential image of Mother Earth is usually placed upon Gaia, the Earth goddess of Classical mythology.
Though she is probably better described as Grandmother Earth since that was her role to most of the gods of Olympus. Not to dismiss the Titans or anything, but let's be honest, no one ever really worshiped the Titans. Also, Gaia hated the vast majority of the Titans by the end of their reign so I don't think she'd mind us thinking of her as Granny Gaia.
Gaia is actually the oldest immortal in the Greco-Roman pantheon as she is the first being that emerged from Chaos, which was kind of just floating around making up the entire universe at the time. Fairly soon afterwards, and I'm sure that time was pretty meaningless then, she gave birth to Pontus and Uranus, who represented the sea and sky respectively. The three of them kind of worked together (I'm sure you can figure out what that means) to form the second generation of immortals, the Titans.
Well, sorta.
Gaia married Uranu


So, please leave any suggestions or requests! And, as always, thanks for reading! 

deviantID

mythgirl68
Virginia
Artist | Hobbyist | Varied
United States
Environmentalist, animal activist, mythographer, historian, writer, and nerd.
Interests
So, next week is Earth week and I would like to continue on in last year's tradition of having a full week of just Earth and nature based mythological beings as the subjects of the Daily Deity. And, as always, I would very much like for suggestions to be made. The suggestion can be either the name of the subject themselves or a pantheon or just a question if there are any gods of apples, for example. (As a matter of fact, there are quite a few.) 

As a reminder these were last year's Earth week Daily Deities:

Daily Deity #166 Pan Gu and the World's BeginningIn honor of the first day of Earth week, we're going to start with one of the many stories that tell of how the Earth and all it's inhabitants were created. For today, we drift into Taoism or Chinese mythology for an explanation.
In the beginning there was an egg.
Which I think just might answer the age-old question of whether it was the chicken or the egg that came first.
Now whether this egg was chaos, or the egg housed chaos, or the egg was surrounded by chaos depends on the story who you're hearing the story from. Really any of the options are viable because the truth of the matter is that it doesn't matter as much where chaos but the fact that chaos was there.
Ah, yes chaos. One of the most primordial entities that ever existed and a commonality that pretty much every single mythology talked about.
Back to the story at hand, because some super important stuff is going on inside that egg. Remember, this is Taoism, and one of the corner stone beliefs of Taoism are the concepts of Yi
    

Daily Deity #167 Mama PachaI've always really loved the name of this Earth goddess, because Mama is really the essence of this goddess.
Mama Pacha is the Incan Earth goddess responsible for the fertility of the land and the growing of crops, effectively making her Mother Earth. Well... at least one of them.
It's not like these are uncommon when it comes to Earth gods, but the importance of these jobs should not be overlooked. Really, these gods are some of the most important in a pantheon, because they are the ones that allow us humans to live. If these gods don't like you, then there is no way that you're going to be growing your food and that means that you're not going to be around much longer either.
While most Earth gods are usually pretty kind and easy-going, Mama Pacha adds something very... ah, violent to the role.
See, Mama Pacha had the ability to take the form of a dragon, and was more than willing to take on that form at any given moment.
Unlike the majority of Earth gods, Mama Pacha is also responsi


Daily Deity #168 MedeinaWhen in the category of nature gods one is going to inevitably find themselves very familiar with gods and goddesses of the hunt as well. Medeina is one of these goddesses.
You'll have to head to the forests of the Baltic nations to find this goddess since that's her home turf. Unfortunately Medeina is a bit hard to track down and so information is a bit limited on her, but that doesn't mean that we're going to ignore her.
Like I said, nature god and gods of the hunt often tend to be linked together, and Medeina is a very good example why that happens. Her main role is not really as a hunting goddess in the way that a goddess like Artemis is, instead Medeina is more of a goddess that does her very best to not allow a hunt to happen.
She does this mainly by employing her symbolic animal, the hare. Whenever a hunter or hunters enter her forest, Medeina will sent out her hares to go run about the forest. The hunters then rush about the woods, following after a creature that is lightening


Daily Deity #169 CernunnosThis Celtic forest god is pretty much the prime example of the Horned God and often functions as one half of the power couple for Wiccans.
Cernunnos has a lot of history to him, but none of it really has anything to do with mythology. Like a vast amount of gods in the world, Cernunnos isn't said to be related to anyone else in his pantheon. Perhaps it's better that Cernunnos doesn't have to worry about family, as he has a lot of roles in the Celtic pantheon.
Before we get into what he does, it's best to get a description of what this god looks like. As I said above, Cernunnos is a Horned God, and that does mean that he has antlers growing out of his head. Massive ones. Ones that would make a perfect ten point buck jealous. Sometimes these deer qualities extend beyond the antlers, and he is sometimes said to have the lower half of deer as well, complete with hooves and fuzzy legs. Commonly, this nature god is also said to possess a fairly magnificent beard and that reminds me of the wis


Daily Deity #170 GaiaThe quintessential image of Mother Earth is usually placed upon Gaia, the Earth goddess of Classical mythology.
Though she is probably better described as Grandmother Earth since that was her role to most of the gods of Olympus. Not to dismiss the Titans or anything, but let's be honest, no one ever really worshiped the Titans. Also, Gaia hated the vast majority of the Titans by the end of their reign so I don't think she'd mind us thinking of her as Granny Gaia.
Gaia is actually the oldest immortal in the Greco-Roman pantheon as she is the first being that emerged from Chaos, which was kind of just floating around making up the entire universe at the time. Fairly soon afterwards, and I'm sure that time was pretty meaningless then, she gave birth to Pontus and Uranus, who represented the sea and sky respectively. The three of them kind of worked together (I'm sure you can figure out what that means) to form the second generation of immortals, the Titans.
Well, sorta.
Gaia married Uranu


So, please leave any suggestions or requests! And, as always, thanks for reading! 

Comments


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:iconreinehela:
ReineHela Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for the llama!
Reply
:iconvalenthyne:
Valenthyne Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2017
This is so impressive! So many posts! I must say, that's something.
Reply
:iconmythgirl68:
mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you very much for the compliments, as well as the watch and the faves. I appreciate your reading my work very much. 
Reply
:iconcytoscourge:
Cytoscourge Featured By Owner Edited Jan 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
212 deities??! JESUSSS....or should I say Odin? Happy New Year old friend <3
Reply
:iconmythgirl68:
mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
I know, crazy right? I can't even believe it! 

And a very Happy New Year to you as well! 
Reply
:iconobelis:
Obelis Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
People have been randomly talking about the god of shoes, so I want to ask... does a deity of shoes exist? I wouldn't be surprised if it did.
Reply
:iconmythgirl68:
mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, off the top of my head I'm thinking about Ullr and Skadi, but they're not really gods of shoes. Ullr is said to have invented skis, and Skadi also usually is connected to this as well. The other gods I can think of is Hermes and Nike. Hermes because of his winged shoes, and Nike because... well, the shoe company. 

To be honest, I'm like convinced that there is a god of shoes specifically, and I can not remember who it is. If you give me a few days, I'll comb through some books and look. 
Reply
:iconobelis:
Obelis Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
DA didn't notify me of this reply for some reason! :ohnoes:

But hearing of a god like this would be amazing, if you can!
Reply
:icontobequitefrank:
ToBeQuiteFrank Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks for favouriting my Greek Epic piece. :)
Reply
:iconmythgirl68:
mythgirl68 Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
You're very welcome! I love the Greek mythology pieces you do! :D (Big Grin) 
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